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Beacon, 2022

3D printed UV Resin, stainless steel, custom electronics, water pump, silicone tubing.

6" x 14" x 18"

One part of a collaborative sculpture (in progress) with Quinton Isaacs.

Grass Piece, 2021

inkjet prints on transparency film, custom electronics with looping video, and copper wire encased in clear resin.

27.5" x 22" x 3"

Part of the body of work for my solo show Clipping at the Foundation Gallery in Kenosha, WI.

This body of work is the product of my reflection on the ways computer generated images (CGI) have integrated into our lives. Informatically distinct from photographic images, computer generated images are a lens by which to view our own relationships to the transparency and opacity of data which we all navigate daily. The show consists of functioning electronics and 3D printed objects cast into wall-mounted resin sculptures of varying transparency — physical manifestations of intersecting (clipped) 3D meshes.

Accompanying these pieces are this essay, which serves as the conceptual basis for these sculptures.

On the Lockheed Burbank Aircraft Factory, 2021

inkjet prints on transparency film, custom electronics with looping video, and copper wire encased in clear resin.

27.5" x 22" x 3"

Part of the body of work for my solo show Clipping at the Foundation Gallery in Kenosha, WI.

This body of work is the product of my reflection on the ways computer generated images (CGI) have integrated into our lives. Informatically distinct from photographic images, computer generated images are a lens by which to view our own relationships to the transparency and opacity of data which we all navigate daily. The show consists of functioning electronics and 3D printed objects cast into wall-mounted resin sculptures of varying transparency — physical manifestations of intersecting (clipped) 3D meshes.

Accompanying these pieces are this essay, which serves as the conceptual basis for these sculptures.

Architectural Study, 2021

inkjet prints on transparency film, custom electronics with looping video, and copper wire encased in clear resin.

27.5" x 22" x 3"

Part of the body of work for my solo show Clipping at the Foundation Gallery in Kenosha, WI.

This body of work is the product of my reflection on the ways computer generated images (CGI) have integrated into our lives. Informatically distinct from photographic images, computer generated images are a lens by which to view our own relationships to the transparency and opacity of data which we all navigate daily. The show consists of functioning electronics and 3D printed objects cast into wall-mounted resin sculptures of varying transparency — physical manifestations of intersecting (clipped) 3D meshes.

Accompanying these pieces are this essay, which serves as the conceptual basis for these sculptures.

Untitled (studies on clipping), 2021

inkjet prints on transparency film, acrylic, clear resin.

dimensions variable

Part of the body of work for my solo show Clipping at the Foundation Gallery in Kenosha, WI.

This body of work is the product of my reflection on the ways computer generated images (CGI) have integrated into our lives. Informatically distinct from photographic images, computer generated images are a lens by which to view our own relationships to the transparency and opacity of data which we all navigate daily. The show consists of functioning electronics and 3D printed objects cast into wall-mounted resin sculptures of varying transparency ‒ physical manifestations of intersecting (clipped) 3D meshes.

Accompanying these pieces are this essay, which serves as the conceptual basis for these sculptures.

Ecopoiesis, 2021

Mixed media installation and animated short film.

156" x 52" x 84"

Made for the 50th annual UC Berkeley MFA exhibition at the Berkeley Art Museum, this body of work speaks to the ways in which new media technologies facilitate a turning inward of extractive neoliberal logics onto our own minds.

It attempts to bridge the space between the geological extraction necessary to develop smart-technologies and the self-exploitative tendencies they foster in users, considering both to be a similar process of terraforming (earth shaping). The looping animation makes this conflation literal, depicting a terraforming process unfolding on a planet-sized brain.

Lossy compression,
2020 - present


Digital photo archive, wireless transceivers and micro-computers, helium balloons, memory receipts

In the first iteration of this project, a micro-computer was attached to a helium balloon and released into the air. The computer on the balloon continually generated and transmitted a poem back to the receiver cube (pictured) on the ground, until the balloon was out of range and the transmission dropped (around 1km). The poem from the first iteration can be found here.

In the second iteration, the receiver cube was outfitted with a receipt printer and a hard-drive containing the only original copies of some 40,000 photographs from my life. The balloon was given a microSD card, and as it floated away, the cube would wirelessly send the balloon a random selection of photographs from the archive. Once the photographs were copied to the balloon's microSD card, the cube would permanently delete the original files from the hard-drive, printing out low resolution copies onto receipt paper which fade with time (memory receipts). The only original copies of the photographs floated away on the lost balloon.

Antenna Tree, 2019

Miniature monopalm antenna tree running SMS server software. Styrofoam, plastic, custom electronics, concrete

36" x 36" x 75"

Viewers who encounter this sculpture can text it to receive images of real-world 4G cellular antennas disguised as both trees and cacti. These fake cell towers ("antenna trees" as they are often called) are a fascinating case study in the visibility and obfuscation of network infrastructures. Service providers will disguise cell-phone towers as comically fake looking trees in an effort to maintain the supposed beauty of our built environment and to soothe our collective paranoias about the omnipresence of wireless technology.